Three Women in Time: poetry and science in March 2015

In March 2015, an event in Bradford will explore the stories of humanity from its earliest days through to the turbulent middle years of the 20th Century, using poetry and spoken word performance to tell stories of three women whose paths met on Mount Carmel in 1932. One of these women died, one went on to great things, and one disappeared.   Jacquetta Hawkes was the second of the three … here’s a glimpse of her take on the experience.

HAW18_3_26_44 Jacquetta Hawkes and Dorothy Garrod with donkeys

Jacquetta Hawkes and Dorothy Garrod with donkeys

We’re thrilled to share the news that Special Collections at the University of Bradford and Trowelblazers have been awarded a grant by the British Science Association for this event, Woman in Time.  Watch this space for more details!

“I’m wholly with you on the question of nuclear disarmament”: Storm Jameson biography published

Jacquetta and J.B. Priestley make many appearances in a new biography of their friend, Margaret Storm Jameson. Born in Whitby, Jameson (1891-1986) was an essayist, novelist, and campaigner for peace and social justice.

life-in-the-writings-of-storm-jameson

Life in the Writings of Storm Jameson, by Elizabeth Maslen, (Northwestern University Press) is based on research in many archives, including ours. Links with the Priestleys, and with our other collections, can be seen throughout the book: for instance Jameson joined J.B. Priestley’s 1941 Committee and championed writers as he did through PEN.  The quotation above comes from a letter to Jacquetta, who persuaded her to join the CND Women’s Committee (Jameson agreed with the cause, but was cautious because she felt she might be of little use and had so many other calls on her time – earning money for her family etc.).

Maslen’s biography will prove an invaluable and impeccably researched resource for a fascinating writer and her literary and campaigning contemporaries.

Jerwood Drawing Prize 2014

We’re delighted to share the news that Kate Morrell’s work has been selected for the 2014 Jerwood Drawing Prize Exhibition.  The work is from Pots before Words, Kate’s exhibition inspired by Jacquetta Hawkes and her involvement with the 1950s television show, Animal, Vegetable, Mineral. 

The Jerwood Drawing Prize is the largest and longest running annual open exhibition for drawing in the UK.  The Exhibition will be on display at Jerwood Space, London from 17 September – 26 October 2014, followed by a UK tour which will include Leeds (more news of this when I have it).  Kate’s work, along with drawings by 45 other exhibitors, was chosen from over 3000 entries.  Congratulations to all!

Reading the Fragments: review of Pots before Words

Alice Miller reviews Pots before Words, Kate Morrell’s exhibition inspired by Jacquetta, in the arts magazine This is Tomorrow.

It’s a fantastic review, with great insight into Jacquetta’s thinking and how Kate has engaged with her. I particularly like this: “Just as Hawkes worked to access prehistory through the study of objects, Morrell has created new objects as a way of accessing the history of Jacquetta Hawkes. ‘Pots before words’ casts the viewer as archaeologist, as Morrell’s body of work encourages thought and discovery, inviting us to read the fragments.”

There’s still time to see the exhibition, which is on at Gallery II at the University of Bradford until 22 May.

Pots Before Words: exhibition Spring 2014

Pots Before Words | Kate Morrell

10 April-22 May 2014

Gallery II, University of Bradford

Kate Morrell Pots before Words

Pots Before Words is an exhibition of new works by Kate Morrell, commissioned by Gallery II at the University of Bradford.  Kate engages with the life and work of Jacquetta Hawkes, via research in her Archive at the University.  PBW features a series of new objects and drawings by Kate.  It centres on Jacquetta’s study of prehistory, her appreciation of the role of pottery, and her humanistic take on archaeology.  Kate is particularly interested in the issues which arise when interpreting or translating from an incomplete or inaccurate record of the past …

Find out more about Gallery II and the exhibition on their website.  Preview 10 April 5-8 pm.

Credit: image courtesy Kate Morrell.

Thanks to the Arts Council England for their support for this exhibition!

96. A Pattern of Invasions and Occupations: Jacquetta Hawkes and the Archaeology of Jersey

Originally posted on 100 Objects:

The Channel Island of Jersey is extraordinarily rich in archaeological remains.  Key sites include La Cotte de St Brelade (a cave filled with Neanderthal stone tools and the bones of mammoths and rhinos) and La Hougue Bie, a prehistoric grave mound topped by a medieval chapel.  Jacquetta Hawkes explored this heritage in her first book: The Archaeology of the Channel Islands: Volume II The Bailiwick of Jersey.

Pen drawings of flints from Les Quennevais and Le Pinacle (The Pinnacle), Jersey, published in The Bailiwick of Jersey by Jacquetta Hawkes pp 66 and 168. Archive ref HAW 1/14.

Pen drawings of flints from Les Quennevais and Le Pinacle (The Pinnacle), Jersey, published in The Bailiwick of Jersey, by Jacquetta Hawkes, pp 66 and 168. Archive reference HAW 1/14.

Volume I, covering the archaeology of Guernsey, had been published by Methuen in 1928.  Its author, Thomas Kendrick, worked at the British Museum, as did Jacquetta’s husband Christopher.  Kendrick had done much of the research for a second volume, on Jersey, by 1934, but “an increase in other work, and a growing…

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Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

Special Collections is closed for the Christmas break from 23 December-3 January inclusive.   We’d like to wish everyone a very merry Christmas and a happy 2014 and look forward to sharing more stories and events with you in the coming year.

Season’s greetings from Special Collections: our 2013 e-card.