Tag Archives: Women

Raising Horizons: celebrating trowelblazing women

Our friends at Trowelblazers are working on an amazing project to celebrate women working in archaeology, geology and palaeontology in the past and present.  Raising Horizons, created in partnership with photographer Leonora Sanders, will be a multimedia exhibition which pairs a modern woman with a historic counterpart.

Image result for raising horizons trowelblazers

Raising Horizons logo featuring modern women working in archaeology, geology and palaeontology.

We are delighted that Jacquetta Hawkes is one of the trowelblazers.  Her partner is Dr Colleen Morgan of the University of York.  They have in common their “explorations of archaeology, its practice and meanings across many different channels, from academic articles to artistic endeavours”.  Find out more about both of them and the other trowelblazing partners in this blog post and this Guardian article about the project.

Help support Raising Horizons through the crowdfunding site Indiegogo.

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Awesome Trowel-wielding Women!

Check out a great new blog: TROWELBLAZERS: “Awesome trowel-wielding women: WE SALUTE YOU!  archaeology | palaeontology | geology”.

Mary Anning, from wikimedia commons via trowelblazers tumblr.

Mary Anning, from wikimedia commons via trowelblazers tumblr.

The blog shares the fascinating stories and achievements of female archaeologists, some well-known, many less so. Meet Dorothea Bate who discovered the Mallorcan mouse-goat, Jane Dieulafoy who got special permission to dress as a man, and a lovely photo of Harriet Boyd Hawes in her swivel chair.  Oh, and Mary Anning of course.  Jacquetta will feature soon!

Wives and Mothers

“Behind every successful man …”  Dr Christine Finn will be discussing wives and mothers in history and fiction with Gaynor Arnold at the Sunday Times Oxford Literary Festival, Saturday 27 March 2010.  Event no 804.  Dr Finn will talk about two women in particular: Ann Dunham, mother of Barack Obama, and Jacquetta Hawkes.   Gaynor Arnold’s novel, Girl in a Blue Dress, was inspired by the difficult marriage of Charles and Catherine Dickens.