Tag Archives: Exhibitions

Raising Horizons: celebrating trowelblazing women

Our friends at Trowelblazers are working on an amazing project to celebrate women working in archaeology, geology and palaeontology in the past and present.  Raising Horizons, created in partnership with photographer Leonora Sanders, will be a multimedia exhibition which pairs a modern woman with a historic counterpart.

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Raising Horizons logo featuring modern women working in archaeology, geology and palaeontology.

We are delighted that Jacquetta Hawkes is one of the trowelblazers.  Her partner is Dr Colleen Morgan of the University of York.  They have in common their “explorations of archaeology, its practice and meanings across many different channels, from academic articles to artistic endeavours”.  Find out more about both of them and the other trowelblazing partners in this blog post and this Guardian article about the project.

Help support Raising Horizons through the crowdfunding site Indiegogo.

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The sun went in, the fire went out

Jacquetta Hawkes and her archive continue to inspire artists and curators!  “The sun went in, the fire went out” is a new exhibition which uses Jacquetta’s  experience to present art made by three avant-garde female artists active during the 1960s and 1970s: Annabel Nicolson, Carlyle Reedy, and Marie Yates.

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“The sun went in, the fire went out”.  Detail from exhibition catalogue front cover: Jacquetta’s handwritten text which inspired the exhibition

 

The curators, Karen di Franco and Elisa Kay, also explore parallels with the work of modernist writer Mary Butts, who, like Jacquetta, was a well-known figure who became marginal – and is now being rediscovered.

What do these women have in common as artists?  The qualities characteristic of A Land, Jacquetta’s greatest and most distinctive work: “resistance to easy categorization, concern for process, and understanding of physical and cultural landscape”, to quote an enthusiastic review by Jonathan P. Watts for Frieze magazine.

The Sun went in, the fire went out: landscapes in film, performance and text” is on show at CHELSEA space, Chelsea College of Arts, from 27 January to 4 March 2016.

 

Sculpture for a Modern World?

“I was born with the ideas of certain shapes in my mind, as far back as seven …”

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The sculptor Barbara Hepworth developed her unique vision early in life – her career refined and developed this into art.  We have seen something similar with her near contemporary, Jacquetta Hawkes, and her interest in the deep past.   Both artists were drawn to the qualities of stone and of landscape, the visual, the tactile – a romantic, lyrical, British take on modernism.

They came together on the experimental film Figures in a Landscape, for which Jacquetta wrote the script, characteristically setting Hepworth’s art in the context of Cornwall’s geology.  Again and again the director, Dudley Shaw Ashton, shows us natural forms in the landscape which then merge with Hepworth’s created forms.  We see her creating too, at work in her studio, hewing her ideas out of the rock with chisel and saw; hard, physical work requiring strength and finesse.

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The film uses strident music by Priaulx Rainier and saturated 1950s colours to striking effect.  Before I saw it, having read the script, I’d pictured the black and white, wild, romantic Du Maurier Cornwall depicted in films of the period.  I remember being surprised and even unsettled by the way the elements of the film were put together, and it made me look again at Hepworth (who, like Henry Moore, may have suffered from over-exposure as a certain kind of public art, ubiquitous and often unloved in public spaces during the 1970s).

This intriguing film is on show as part of a major Hepworth retrospective.  Open from 24 June-25 October 2015, Sculpture for a Modern World has been extensively reviewed and discussed and will bring Hepworth and her contemporaries to new audiences.  I hope to visit the exhibition next time I am in London – watch this space!

Reading the Fragments: review of Pots before Words

Alice Miller reviews Pots before Words, Kate Morrell’s exhibition inspired by Jacquetta, in the arts magazine This is Tomorrow.

It’s a fantastic review, with great insight into Jacquetta’s thinking and how Kate has engaged with her. I particularly like this: “Just as Hawkes worked to access prehistory through the study of objects, Morrell has created new objects as a way of accessing the history of Jacquetta Hawkes. ‘Pots before words’ casts the viewer as archaeologist, as Morrell’s body of work encourages thought and discovery, inviting us to read the fragments.”

There’s still time to see the exhibition, which is on at Gallery II at the University of Bradford until 22 May.

Pots Before Words: exhibition Spring 2014

Pots Before Words | Kate Morrell

10 April-22 May 2014

Gallery II, University of Bradford

Pots Before Words is an exhibition of new works by Kate Morrell, commissioned by Gallery II at the University of Bradford.  Kate engages with the life and work of Jacquetta Hawkes, via research in her Archive at the University.  PBW features a series of new objects and drawings by Kate.  It centres on Jacquetta’s study of prehistory, her appreciation of the role of pottery, and her humanistic take on archaeology.  Kate is particularly interested in the issues which arise when interpreting or translating from an incomplete or inaccurate record of the past …

Find out more about Gallery II and the exhibition on their website.  Preview 10 April 5-8 pm.

Credit: image courtesy Kate Morrell.

Thanks to the Arts Council England for their support for this exhibition!

An Artist in the Archive: welcoming Kate Morrell

An exciting new project for 2014.  Special Collections and Arts on Campus at the University of Bradford are commissioning artist Kate Morrell to explore the Jacquetta Hawkes Archive.  As a look at Kate’s website reveals, there are fascinating connections between Kate’s interests and the Archive.   Kate has used classic mountaineering tales, flints, geological surveys, and archaeological practice as inspirations for her work.  Like Jacquetta in her writings, Kate is drawn to reflections on our relationships with nature, the past, and the making of objects.

Arrowhead in the Jacquetta Hawkes Archive, bought in Taos New Mexico

Arrowhead in the Jacquetta Hawkes Archive, bought in Taos New Mexico

Her work will be exhibited in Gallery II at the University in the Spring of 2014.  We look forward to collaborating with Kate and seeing what she makes of the Archive.

Overlooked: exploring the outsider artist

Jacquetta’s biographer Dr Christine Finn is curating an exhibition called Overlooked in her home town of Deal, from 22-30 June. The exhibition, part of the Love Architecture festival, reflects on outsider art through all kinds of activities. It is centred on Dr Finn’s family home, now an art space..

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Bird House, photograph by Christine Finn