Tag Archives: Artists

The sun went in, the fire went out

Jacquetta Hawkes and her archive continue to inspire artists and curators!  “The sun went in, the fire went out” is a new exhibition which uses Jacquetta’s  experience to present art made by three avant-garde female artists active during the 1960s and 1970s: Annabel Nicolson, Carlyle Reedy, and Marie Yates.

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“The sun went in, the fire went out”.  Detail from exhibition catalogue front cover: Jacquetta’s handwritten text which inspired the exhibition

 

The curators, Karen di Franco and Elisa Kay, also explore parallels with the work of modernist writer Mary Butts, who, like Jacquetta, was a well-known figure who became marginal – and is now being rediscovered.

What do these women have in common as artists?  The qualities characteristic of A Land, Jacquetta’s greatest and most distinctive work: “resistance to easy categorization, concern for process, and understanding of physical and cultural landscape”, to quote an enthusiastic review by Jonathan P. Watts for Frieze magazine.

The Sun went in, the fire went out: landscapes in film, performance and text” is on show at CHELSEA space, Chelsea College of Arts, from 27 January to 4 March 2016.

 

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The Return of Lazy Susan

The rich visual and creative imagination of Jacquetta Hawkes continues to inspire artists: working with them is one of the delights of managing her Archive.  In 2014, Kate Morrell created the exhibition Pots Before Words for Gallery II at the University of Bradford.  She drew on the ideas and formats to be found in the collection to develop fascinating new artworks, including this sculpture and “portable toolkit”, Lazy Susan.

Lazy Susan

In March 2015, we will be delighted to welcome Kate and Lazy Susan back to Bradford.  Kate is extending and reflecting on the original project by filming female archaeologists and archivists (using Lazy Susan) to discuss and explore artefacts from their profession.  I will be one of the interviewees!

Reading the Fragments: review of Pots before Words

Alice Miller reviews Pots before Words, Kate Morrell’s exhibition inspired by Jacquetta, in the arts magazine This is Tomorrow.

It’s a fantastic review, with great insight into Jacquetta’s thinking and how Kate has engaged with her. I particularly like this: “Just as Hawkes worked to access prehistory through the study of objects, Morrell has created new objects as a way of accessing the history of Jacquetta Hawkes. ‘Pots before words’ casts the viewer as archaeologist, as Morrell’s body of work encourages thought and discovery, inviting us to read the fragments.”

There’s still time to see the exhibition, which is on at Gallery II at the University of Bradford until 22 May.

An Artist in the Archive: welcoming Kate Morrell

An exciting new project for 2014.  Special Collections and Arts on Campus at the University of Bradford are commissioning artist Kate Morrell to explore the Jacquetta Hawkes Archive.  As a look at Kate’s website reveals, there are fascinating connections between Kate’s interests and the Archive.   Kate has used classic mountaineering tales, flints, geological surveys, and archaeological practice as inspirations for her work.  Like Jacquetta in her writings, Kate is drawn to reflections on our relationships with nature, the past, and the making of objects.

Arrowhead in the Jacquetta Hawkes Archive, bought in Taos New Mexico

Arrowhead in the Jacquetta Hawkes Archive, bought in Taos New Mexico

Her work will be exhibited in Gallery II at the University in the Spring of 2014.  We look forward to collaborating with Kate and seeing what she makes of the Archive.